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Introduction to Mythology


 

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961)

 

The concept of the archetype ... is derived from the repeated observation that, for instance, the myths and fairy tales of world literature contain definite motifs which crop up everywhere. We meet these same motifs in the fantasies, dreams, deliria, and delusions of individuals living today. These typical images and associations are what I call archetypal ideas. The more vivid they are, the more they will be colored by particularly strong feeling-tones ... They impress, influence, and fascinate us. They have their origin in the archetype, which in itself is an irrepresentable, unconscious, pre-existent form that seems to be part of the inherited structure of the psyche and can therefore manifest itself spontaneously anywhere, at any time. Because of its instinctual nature, the archetype underlies the feeling-toned complexes and shares their autonomy.

Carl G. Jung, Collected Works, Volume 10, Paragraph 847

 

Jung as a Young Man Jung and Socrates

Jung's Iceberg Model of Human Consciousness

 

 

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Jung Is One of the Greatest Alchemists of the 20th Century.

 

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His Disciples Called Him the "Hexenmeister of Zurich."

 

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Jung's Iceberg Model of Human Consciousness - Tripartite Scheme Consisting of Ego, Personal Unconscious and the Collective Unconscious.

 

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Jung's Theory of Archetypes - "The Archetype Is a Symbolic Formula Which Always Begins to Function When There Are No Conscious Ideas Present, or When Conscious Ideas Are Inhibited for Internal or External Reasons."

 

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Archetypes Frequently Manifest Themselves in Our Dreams.

 

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"Archetypes Create Myths, Religions, and Philosophical Ideas That Influence and Set Their Stamp on Whole Nations and Epochs."

 

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Myths Arise From the Collective Unconscious and Consist of Archetypes. "In Fact, the Whole of Mythology Could Be Taken As a Sort of Projection of the Collective Unconscious."

 

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Many Students of Mythology and Religion Such As Joseph Campbell (1904-1987) and Mircea Eliade (1907-1986) Have Adapted Jung's Theory of Archetypes into Their Own Theories.
 

 


Home Myths Legends Folktales Fairytales Fables Oral Transmission Textual Transmission Storytellers Plato Euhemerus Max Müller E. B. Tylor James Frazer Sigmund Freud G. I. Gurdjieff Giorgio de Santillana Carl Jung Evans-Wentz Joseph Campbell Marija Gimbutas Vladimir Propp Claude Lévi-Strauss Walter Burkert Bronze Age Persia and India Ancient Europe Africa and Australia Native American Modern Myths