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Introduction to Mythology


 

Textual Transmission

 

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As the name implies, textual transmission occurs when the initial propagating medium is not by word of mouth (orally), but is provided in a permanent or semi-permanent written or pictorial form.

 

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From about 3200 B.C. to 1450 A.D., textual transmission meant the use of hand-written, hard copy media such as papyrus scrolls, parchment codices, wall inscriptions, paintings, etc.

 

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Since about 1450, when the printing press was invented, until about 1900, the primary textual media were books or newspapers.

 

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In the 20th century, analog media was added such as radio, television, phonograph records and film. 

 

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Since the early 1980s, digital media became available such as CDs, DVDs, computer hard drives, etc.

 

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Since the 1990s, electronically propagated social media has been added such as the internet, facebook, twitter, etc. 

 

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The addition of all this new media is having a revolutionary impact on all our lives and the ultimate effects have not yet been assessed!

 

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Some examples of textually transmitted myths are:

 

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The Aeneid by Virgil (late 1st century B.C.);

 

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The Bell Witch of Tennessee by M. V. Ingram (1894);

 

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Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson by G. I. Gurdjieff (mid-20th century);

 

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Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (1950s);

 

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The Star Wars films produced by George Lucas (late 20th century).

 

 


Home Myths Legends Folktales Fairytales Fables Oral Transmission Textual Transmission Storytellers Plato Euhemerus Max Müller E. B. Tylor James Frazer Sigmund Freud G. I. Gurdjieff Giorgio de Santillana Carl Jung Evans-Wentz Joseph Campbell Marija Gimbutas Vladimir Propp Claude Lévi-Strauss Walter Burkert Bronze Age Persia and India Ancient Europe Africa and Australia Native American Modern Myths